Why we do it

 

The Money Economy Fails to Meet Many of Our Fundamental Human Needs!

 

The Core Economy values the importance of contributions that are not valued highly in the money economy, like raising healthy children, caring for the elderly, nurturing friendly relationships with one's neighbors, civic participation, environmental stewardship, standing up for democracy and social justice, to name just a few. The core sphere of the economy consists of households, families, and community groups that organize the many important economic activities central to sustaining human life. The core economy is made up of all the resources embedded in people’s everyday lives – time, energy, wisdom, experience, knowledge, and skills – and the relationships between them – love, empathy, watchfulness, care, reciprocity, teaching, and learning. The core economy is the basic, essential, platform on which the market economy and public services run. Our government services dealing with crime, education, care, health, and so on are all underpinned by the family, the neighborhood, community, and civil society -- the core economy.

 

Time Banking Fully Values the Core Economy

 

Time Banking's Core Values:

  • Everyone is an asset. We can all help co-create the community in which we'd like to live.
  • Some work's value is beyond a monetary price. Such as caring for each other and our environment.
  • Reciprocity in helping. Helping works better as a two-way exchange. All involved are more 'helped'.
  • Social networks are necessary. (Real social networks foster trust, and build vibrant and pleasant communities).
  • A respect for all human beings. We're all in this together – and we can all learn from each other.

 

For more explanation of these values, and an over-view of how time banking can address several of society's problems, and benefit you and your community, please take few minutes to watch this interview with Edgar Cahn – the founder of Time Banks US.

 

Time Banking - Dr Edgar Cahn

Nesta [uknesta]. (2011, May 11). Link

If you are intrigued to learn more, you may enjoy reading, No More Throw-Away People: The Co-Production Imperative, by Edgar s. Cahn. (Essential Books, Washington, D.C., 2004, 2000).

Here's more information about about co-production. Here's a great introductory video.